Scaling sociocracy is all about the context

Scaling sociocracy is all about the context. And it has to be done by invitation in the first place. Sociocracy is, in a wider sense, rule by the “socios,” people who have a social relationship with each other. The following is a quote of John Schinnerer from the Sociocracy email discussion list on Yahoo, April 17, 2015:

“Context is everything. When you don’t have socios, sociocracy may have some parts and pieces to offer the situation, but is not likely to function as designed. … Doesn’t mean it’s not worth trying. But consent is fundamental. They would need to consent to working that way, first of all.”

I think that collaboration arises naturally somehow, including necessary structures, if there’s a “socios” and something really important is at stake. And I think that we focus too much on the methods, and too little on the context, including the “socios.” Sociocracy will not scale unless there is a “socios” and a clear common aim, which has importance or urgency to it.

Related posts:
Sociocracy requires a new mindset
Scrum vs. Sociocracy
Sociocratic principles can be implemented in many ways
Sociocracy is a method, and still it isn’t
Implementing sociocracy without sociocracy
Sociocracy as practiced by the G/wi
Policies vs. agreements
Unspoken sociocratic principles
Cultural dimensions of sociocracy
A prerequisite for sociocracy is a socios
Holacracy vs. sociocracy
The phenomenology of sociocracy
Are Holacracy and sociocracy Teal?
The big misconception in sociocracy
Is Sociocracy an empty method?

Related posts in Swedish:
Holakrati, holokrati och sociokrati
Hur införa sociokrati i en organisation (del 1)?
Hur införa sociokrati i en organisation (del 2)?
Sociokrati är som permakultur, fast för människor
Sociokrati är som en skogsträdgård
Kurs i kväkarnas beslutsmetod, som sociokrati bygger på
En historisk tillbakablick på kväkarnas beslutsmetod
Sociokratibok: Idag publiceras boken
Några tankar om sociokrati
Min gästblogg på #skolvåren: Att organisera oss rätt

Published by Jan Höglund

Jan Höglund has over 35 years of experience in different roles as software developer, project manager, line manager, consultant, and researcher. This is his personal blog where he shares his reading, book reviews, and learning.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *