Etikettarkiv: Value

Organizing reflection 21

This is a post in my series on organizing ”between and beyond.” Other posts are here. The purpose of this post is to reflect on subjects occupying my mind. I make no claim to fully believe what I write. Neither do I pretend that others have not already thought or written about the same subject. More often than not, I take up, combine, and add to already existing thoughts and ideas.

What is on my mind?
Today’s reflection is inspired by this and this post by Michelle Holliday (@thrivability).

Michelle writes (my emphasis in bold):

It usually takes more than action to generate and support change. …

We need to reconnect with what matters. We need to rediscover our place in the whole of life. …

Ultimately, what we need is to find the collective will to cultivate life’s ability to thrive … in every sphere of society. …

The outgoing worldview has been dominated by persuasion and even coercion, “driving” and “incentivizing” change.

Cultivating thrivability is not a discrete item on your to-do list; it’s an ongoing life practice…

Everything comes down to our ability to acknowledge and celebrate the precious gift of aliveness, source of our kinship with all existence.

It is through a sense of place … that we connect with the generative dimension of life most directly.1

Michelle also writes (my emphasis in bold):

Beyond specific techniques or the latest management fads, then, thrivability calls for a conscious commitment to nurturing life. It asks us to recognize the life in our organization—acknowledging that the organization isn’t something we can fully manage and control, but that our role is as stewards and participants, creating fertile conditions for life to flow and thrive across the fullness of the organizational ecosystem and beyond. —

For individual organizations, the lesson seems to be: get on in whatever way you can… Keep moving forward. … Adjust your speed and direction until you find the flow. And you will find it.2

Generative organizing calls for a conscious commitment to creating fertile conditions for life to flow and thrive accross our organizational ecosystems and beyond. It’s about reconnecting with what really matters, acknowledging the precious gift of life itself. It’s about finding and staying in the flow.

Notes:
1 Michelle Holliday, Beyond Best Practices—How to Listen for Generative Threads of Aliveness in Stories of What Works | Medium, 2018-08-13 (accessed 2018-08-14).
2 Michelle Holliday, Lessons from Amsterdam | Medium, 2018-08-14 [first published 2013-10-31] (accessed 2018-08-14).

Related posts:
Organizing in between and beyond posts

Organizing reflection 14

This is a post in my series on organizing ”between and beyond.” Other posts are here. The purpose of this post is to reflect on subjects occupying my mind. I make no claim to fully believe what I write. Neither do I pretend that others have not already thought or written about the same subject. More often than not, I take up, combine, and add to already existing thoughts and ideas.

What is on my mind?
Yesterday, Skye Hirst and I talked about the dis-valuation of intrinsic value and the over-valuation of systemic value. The valuation of the systemic over all other value dimensions is very common—and it is a core issue!

The systemic is easy to organize, because it’s about right and wrong. But if I dis-value myself as a person, I have to come up with a system of thought what makes me a good person. And it doesn’t matter what I come up with. It’s still abstracted, made up. If the systemic is over-valued, and is my only value, it leaves out other values, like the value of life, the value of being imperfect, or whatever is unacceptable in a systemic world.

We’ve got to witness each other’s lives! —Skye Hirst

Until I can help you witness my pain, you’re not going to understand. We’ve got to talk about our feelings, pain, struggle. We need to find a common place among us. That’s where we get to the intrinsic. Feeling, experiencing, and witnessing, telling stories, are intrinsic ways of communicating.

Generative organizing requires witnessing, experiencing, and feeling. We need to move ‘up‘ into our hearts (‘up‘ because intrinsic value has ‘higher‘ value than systemic value).2

Notes:
1 The distinction between intrinsic value and systemic value is from Robert S. Hartmans value theory. For more details, see my reviews of Robert S. Hartman’s books Freedom to Live and The Structure of Value.
2 Systemic, extrinsic, and intrinsic value are the three value dimensions. Intrinsic value is more valuable than extrinsic value, and extrinsic more valuable than systemic value. See Robert S. Hartman, The Structure of Value: Foundations of Scientific Axiology (Wopf & Stock, 2011, first published 1967), p. 114.

Related posts:
Organizing in between and beyond posts

Organizing reflection 4

This is a post in my series on organizing ”between and beyond.” Other posts are here. The purpose of this post is to reflect on subjects occupying my mind. I make no claim to fully believe what I write. Neither do I pretend that others have not already thought or written about the same subject. More often than not, I take up, combine, and add to already existing thoughts and ideas. Here is my previous reflection.

What is on my mind?
People ARE assets
This is a further development of my first reflection. I wrote in this reflection that people are NOT assets. Well, people ARE assets — systemically. It all depends on whether you take a systemic, extrinsic, or intrinsic perspective:1

  1. People ARE assets from a systems perspective. Their systemic value are as assets.
  2. People also have extrinsic value as a type of asset. Notice that the extrinsic value of people can be compared with the value of other type of assets, say, relationships BETWEEN people. We can claim, as is done in this reflection, that it’s NOT people, but the relationships BETWEEN people that are our greatest asset.
  3. People, finally, have intrinsic value as human beings. This has far-reaching consequences that I will come back to in future reflections. A corollary is that people are NOT assets — intrinsically.

Notes:
1 Systemic, extrinsic, and intrinsic value are three value dimensions defined by Robert S. Hartman. See, Hartman, The Structure of Value: Foundations of Scientific Axiology, p.114.

Related posts:
Book Review: The Structure of Value by Robert S. Hartman
Organizing in between and beyond posts

Organizing reflection 3

This is a post in my series on organizing ”between and beyond.” Other posts are here. The purpose of this post is to reflect on subjects occupying my mind. I make no claim to fully believe what I write. Neither do I pretend that others have not already thought or written about the same subject. More often than not, I take up, combine, and add to already existing thoughts and ideas. Here is my previous reflection. Here is my next reflection.

What is on my mind?
Money is NOT value
I am tweeting quotes from Dee Hock’s Autobiography of a Restless Mind Volume 1, and get interesting replies. Dee Hock writes that money is not value.1 Gunther Sonnenfeld (@goonth) replies that money can be high value depending on its application.

Gunther Sonnenfeld (@goonth) 2018-01-02–03. Tweets.

I think that Dee Hock points to the intrinsic value in community and relationship, while Gunther Sonnenfeld refers to the extrinsic and systemic value of money.2 These perspectives are, of course, interrelated.

All perspectives are, in fact, needed. It’s important to remember, though, that — axiologically — intrinsic value is more valuable than extrinsic value, and extrinsic value more valuable than systemic value.3  So, what I think Dee Hock is saying is that money has no intrinsic value.

Intrinsic value is often forgotten, although it has the highest value.

Notes:
1 Dee Hock, Autobiography of a Restless Mind: Reflections on the Human Condition Volume 1 (iUniverse, 2012), p.19.
2 Intrinsic value, extrinsic value, and systemic value are the three value dimensions defined by Robert S. Hartman. See, Hartman, The Structure of Value: Foundations of Scientific Axiology, p.114.
3 Ibid..

Related posts:
Book Review: The Structure of Value by Robert S. Hartman
Organizing in between and beyond posts