Skye Hirst on decision-making

Introduction
Skye Hirst is one of the interesting persons I have encountered during my search for more life-affirming ways of working together. Skye Hirst writes, for example, in her article on Value Intelligence in All Creative Organisms that it is an inalienable right to be free to act according to one’s own beinghood.

Decision-making is coming to coherence
I am very interested in collective decision-making. Skye Hirst sent an article on Decision Making — Coming to Coherence. Skye Hirst writes:

Decision-making is a learning process.

Everyone has some expertise and lived experience to draw from that brought the growing and learning to be situation and hand.

Part of every moment of decision-making is discovery…
…a choice is made for the best action at that moment.

What works best…is when…three kinds of values are considered…
all are necessary for sustainable community coherence creating.

1) The aesthetics, action that allows for greatest freedom with least interference… Like grand coherence.
2) The practical, …seen from previous known experience… Another part…is how do we get it done, whatever we are choosing?
3) …the agreements, the rules, the laws …chosen…for harmonizing the whole…

Some people focus more on one value dimension than others. It doesn’t make them wrong, it only means they have only part of the view of what is needed.

When…alignment occurs…it has an ability to bring people into unity for a bit of time.

Conclusion
Coming to coherence requires that all three value dimensions are considered in the decision making. Usually, the focus is on the third dimension (rules, laws). It’s not wrong, but it’s only when all dimensions are considered that a choice can be made for best action — in that situation, at that moment, for that group. The systemic dimension (rules) is sufficient for machines, but not for human beings.

Related posts:
Autognomics: Radical self-knowing
Essential organizing principles for life


Published by Jan Höglund

Jan Höglund has over 35 years of experience in different roles as engineer, manager, consultant, and researcher. This is his personal blog where he shares his reading and learning.

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